Reshaping The Traditional Male Female Sales Relationship Paradigm

Sales is not an easy industry for anyone to succeed in. You live and breathe by your most recent efforts and people are always cynical of your intentions. Sales managers need to find ways to align their sales staff with the opportunities that best deliver success and most of the time that will be based on knowledge of industries or geographic accessibility.

The SEO team at SearchButlers prefers to align its sales staff not by industry focus, or geographic focus but by client focus. This means the inbound team will speak with prospects and try to understand the psychographic personality traits of the business owners or marketing managers they speak to and align an outbound sales representative to that account that has the best fit as a personality rather than as a knowledge hub based on geographic or industrial alignment. There is nothing to new about this approach. In the financial industry, for decades clients have been associated with team members that will offer the best experience as possible however the traditional model where females have participated in this system is that they are often used as desirable “eye candy” for more aggressive ego driven buyers within their client base.

An archaic and disgusting sexualization of talent but it has worked successfully for these institutions in a world that until now has tolerated this intangible abuse. Whats different about SearchButlers model however is that they will align their female staff with female clients more often than not in sympathy with the cultural aspects of the industries more commonly run by female business owners – education, retail, and medical and seek to align the more aggressive male industries with male sales staff so a not to participate in the old paradigm that undermines the intelligence and emotional approach that females would take in a world where performance only drivers and impatience are the most commonly found criteria for business. Industries like automotive or construction for example. It works well for all involved, the teams only have great feedback for the management in terms of appreciation for the efforts that go into understanding the personalities of both clients and staff but also for protection from certain societal realities that won’t necessarily end anytime soon!…

Read More →

How Artist Cardi B Became A Stripper To Escape Domestic Violence

Some people sat that art imitates life and others believe life imitates art

Back in 2015 Cardi B took the time to speak exclusively to VladTV about what influencers made her become a stripper. The artist revealed that she turned to dancing in order to make her own money and to try to escape an abusive boyfriend. The Love & Hip Hop song creator star explained that while she wouldn’t advise other young women to follow her path, she did tell us that stripping saved her life.

In a bizarre spin on the natural order of things, many would be forgiven if they presumes that a life as a female stripper may in fact act as the catalyst to an environment that is more likely to find abuse but Cardi B said it was her ticker to empowerment, confidence and the financial wherewithal to have the ability to escape. The same challenging preconceptions of stripping are so not so commonly found in the world of male strippers. When we reached out to the team at malestrippers.com.au to try to establish the reasons for their dancers moving into the industry, the overarching rationale was not one of a struggle not one of abuse but instead it came from a love of fitness that afforded these young men the opportunity to benefit financially as side gigs to their main income. An interesting contrast in perceptions opportunities and outcomes once again seen between the two species.

During that incredibly confronting conversation Cardi also spoke about the dangers of getting illegal butt shots, among other things as she doesn’t know what she had injected into her butt during her early 20s. You can check out more of what Cardi had to say about butt shots, stripping, and more in the clip that can be found at the VLAD Tv Youtube channel.…

Read More →

Never Leave Without AnExit Strategy

Technology – Cover your tracks online
Warning:
 if you’re worried about someone knowing you have visited this website please read the following safety information. 

If you want to be completely sure of not being tracked online, the safest way would be to access the internet at a local library, an internet cafe, friend’s house or at work.

Go to Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria (DVRCV) website and look at TEDF for more information.

How can an abuser discover your internet activities? 
Computer spyware is becoming very easy to purchase and install on home computers. You may think that you are safe to access a home computer, not knowing that what you do is being tracked.

Abusers can also look at the history of sites you’ve visited easily.As a rule, internet browsers will save certain information as you surf the internet. This includes images from websites visited, words entered into search engines and a trail (‘history’) that reveals the sites you have visited.  

“Having a safety plan and getting some support were the first steps I made towards leaving”

Leaving a relationship safely and remaining safe can be organised more effectively if you have a safety plan ready.  Keep your plan and any associated paper work hidden from your partner.  

Personal Safety 
(Reproduced with kind permission of the  see link to their site in the “Information and Links” section).

Keeping yourself and your children safe whether you are still in the relationship or have left is vital.   Preparing a safety plan today, might help you and your children if there is a risk of violence in the future.…

Read More →

Spotting Signs of Family & Domestic Violence

Warning Signals Checklist
(Please note that this checklist is reproduced with kind permission of the Domestic Violence Prevention Centre Gold Coast – see link to their site in “Information and Links” section).

If you find yourself answering yes to any of the questions below may mean you are in danger.  Whether the violence or abuse has happened once or many times, you are at risk.  If you find yourself in need then make sure you contact a reputable family lawyer.

These behaviours indicate your partner is choosing to use a system of power and control over you.
Emotional abuse

• Does he call you names or make you feel bad about the way you look?
• Does he verbally degrade your self-worth by constantly putting you down?

Physical abuse
• Has he ever pushed, shoved, slapped, pinched, punched, or physically hurt you?
• Does he have a history of using violence with others?

Using male privilege
• Does he always see himself as superior or always right?
• Does he treat you like you are a possession that can be owned?
• Does he insist on making all the big decisions?

Using coercion and threats
• Does he use force or coercion to make you do things against your will?
• Has he threatened to hurt the children, friends, family members or pets?
• Has he threatened to report you to Centrelink, Taxation Department, or others?
• Has he ever threatened to leave you?
• Insist you dress more or less sexually than you want?

Using isolation
• Does he try to control your contact with your family and friends?
• Does he need to know where you are constantly?
• Does he insist that you are always at home, or only let you out of the house if he is with you or insist on knowing where you are going?
• Does he monitor or limit your phone calls, conversations and emails? 
• Does he check the mileage on the car to see if he can work out where you have been or who you have seen?

Sexual abuse
• Does he pressure you to have sex which is unpleasant, pressured or forced? 
• Made you do something very humiliating or degrading? 
• Made you have sex after emotional or physical abuse or when you are sick? 

Minimising, denying and blaming
• Does he blame you for his anger and violence, saying it was your fault? 
• Does he say that you were “asking for it” after physically hitting or abusing you? 
• Does he deny using violence or say it wasn’t that bad? 

Using Intimidation
• Does he smash your belongings or break things around the house? 
• Has he ever punched holes in the walls or doors? 
• Is he easily angered and prone to sudden mood swings?
• Does your talking to members of the opposite sex result in unfounded jealousy and suspicion that is out of proportion? 

Economic abuse
• Taken away your money or controlled how you spend it?
• Refused to pay the household bills, or to give any money towards them?

Using the children
• Has he told you that you would lose custody or never see the children again? 
• Does he question the children to find out information about you

\What is Family Violence?
• Physical or sexual abuse;
• Emotional or psychological abuse;
• Economic abuse (such as with-holding money or
  family resources);
• Threats or coercion;
• Isolating you from family & friends;
• Harming things you love (such as pets, personal belongings);
• Controlling or dominating you, causing you to fear for your safety 
  or the wellbeing of another person.
• Causing your child to hear, witness, or otherwise be exposed to 
  the effects of violence.
Family Violence…
• Can happen to anyone,
 but is mainly committed by men against women, children and other vulnerable people.

• Affects children.  Children who are exposed to family violence are particularly vulnerable and it can impact on their physical, psychological and emotional well being.

• Affects the entire community.  It occurs in all areas of society, regardless of location, socioeconomic and health status, age, culture, sexual identity, ability, ethnicity or religion.

• Extends beyond physical and sexual violence and may involve emotional, psychological and economic abuse.

• May involve overt or subtle exploitation of power and imbalances and may consist of isolated incidents or patterns of abuse over a period of time.…

Read More →